Are Sleepy Workers Damaging Your Business’s Health?

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In June 2014, a truck driver from Georgia drove 800 miles from his home to his Delaware workplace. Without stopping to rest, he then got behind the wheel of a Wal-Mart tractor trailer and headed north. He rear-ended a limousine bus on the New Jersey turnpike, starting a chain-reaction crash involving six vehicles and 21 people. Comedy writer James McNair died and television comedian Tracy Morgan suffered serious injuries. The National Transportation Safety Board concluded that the driver, who had been awake for 28 hours, caused the crash because he was fatigued. Employers are increasingly becoming aware of the problems…
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Pallet Safety Key to Preventing Many Injuries

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If you have a warehouse and store products on pallets, you may not be aware that they present one of the most common workplace hazards. The most common injuries around pallets are when workers trip over them or step or fall on them. Sometimes employees will step on a wooden pallet for support to reach something up high. Also, an empty pallet that has not been put away creates a tripping hazard, and injuries from this cause are the most common. Many workers hurt themselves because they did not see the pallet or were not aware that it could break…
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Fall Protection Training Makes Debut on OSHA’s Top 10 Citations List

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There’s a newcomer to OSHA’s top 10 list of violations that it cites every year: Fall Protection – Training Requirements. While physical fall protection violations, like failing to install guard-rails or provide fall protection equipment, continue to feature at the top of the list, this is the first time that training requirements as a stand-alone category has made it onto OSHA’s preliminary list of most-cited violations has featured. The fact that OSHA has doled out so many citations for such training-requirement violations reflects its increasing commitment to reduce injuries and deaths from trips, slips and falls – the most common…
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Eight Tips for Improving Personal Protective Equipment and Safety Compliance

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Having adequate personal protective equipment on hand and available for employees to use is a critical part of your workplace safety and compliance program. OSHA regulations and applicable federal laws make employers responsible for the following: • A thorough and complete survey and assessment of workplace hazards. • Identifying all PPE required and ensuring it is purchased in sufficient quantity. • Training in proper PPE usage and wear. • Enforcing rules requiring PPE usage. • Inspecting and maintaining PPE and replacing it when it gets worn out or becomes unserviceable. • Keeping records of safety incidents and updating your PPE…
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Could Your Staff Respond to a Medical Emergency?

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If one of your employees or a customer had a serious medical emergency while at work, would your staff know how to respond? Unfortunately, most U.S. employees are not prepared to handle cardiac emergencies in the workplace because they lack training in CPR and first aid, according to new survey results from the American Heart Association. The AHA found that most workers do not have access to CPR and first aid training, and half could not locate an automated external defibrillator at work. The findings reflect the poor preparation many people have for dealing with a medical emergency and, since…
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OSHA Electronic Filing Deadline Extended to December

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OSHA has issued final rules that delay for large employers and those in high-risk industries the electronic filing deadline for 2016 annual injury and illness records until Dec. 1, 2017. The new rule changes an Obama-era federal OSHA regulation that required employers with 250 workers, in addition to firms with 20 or more employees operating in various high-risk industries (such as construction, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation and retail) to file their 2016 Form 300A electronically. The original deadline was July 1. OSHA also said that the delay would give employers more time to prepare their systems for electronic submissions and get…
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Creating a Strong Safety Program for Your Fleet Drivers

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While most operations with an automotive or trucking fleet focus on safety, few businesses are actually monitoring their drivers to make sure they are adhering to the company’s rules, a new study has found. Many companies only pull reports on their drivers’ records on an annual basis, which means they miss important developments like a DUI or a few moving violations that will increase the cost of insuring them. In fact, 70% of companies with fleets do not even monitor their drivers and 60% don’t have a safety program in place, according to the study by SambaSafety, a firm that…
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Silica Safety Enforcement Delayed for Construction Industry

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Cal/OSHA has delayed enforcement of its crystalline silica safety standard for the construction industry for another three months to ensure the California rules are in synch with federal rules on the dangerous airborne matter. The move came after Fed OSHA announced April 6 a delay in adoption of the crystalline silica standard for the sector “to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers.” The silica rules have already been in effect for general industry since 2016 and the delay in enforcement is only for the construction industry. Enforcement for the construction sector was slated to start…
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Drug Use Skyrockets among American Workers

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Drug use is rapidly increasing among American workers, as more states liberalize marijuana laws, cocaine makes a resurgence and more people abuse amphetamines and heroin. A new study by Quest Diagnostics Inc., a workplace drug-testing lab, found that the number of workers testing positive for illicit drugs is higher than at any time in the last 12 years. That puts employers in a tricky predicament, particularly if employees are using at work, which could reduce productivity and also make them more susceptible to workplace injuries since they may not be as focused as they should be on their work. In…
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Getting Buy-in from Managers on Workplace Safety Programs

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One of the keys to instituting a good safety program is to get management and supervisor buy-in. You need their support and belief in the system if you are to convince your employees to embrace your safety regimen. If your managers don’t believe in the safety plans you have put together, it will show through when they try to sell them to your staff. If you don’t have buy-in from your managers, the chances are slim to none that your employees will embrace the changes you are proposing. Managers play a crucial role in getting employees on board with safety….
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