Could Your Staff Respond to a Medical Emergency?

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If one of your employees or a customer had a serious medical emergency while at work, would your staff know how to respond? Unfortunately, most U.S. employees are not prepared to handle cardiac emergencies in the workplace because they lack training in CPR and first aid, according to new survey results from the American Heart Association. The AHA found that most workers do not have access to CPR and first aid training, and half could not locate an automated external defibrillator at work. The findings reflect the poor preparation many people have for dealing with a medical emergency and, since…
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OSHA Electronic Filing Deadline Extended to December

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OSHA has issued final rules that delay for large employers and those in high-risk industries the electronic filing deadline for 2016 annual injury and illness records until Dec. 1, 2017. The new rule changes an Obama-era federal OSHA regulation that required employers with 250 workers, in addition to firms with 20 or more employees operating in various high-risk industries (such as construction, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation and retail) to file their 2016 Form 300A electronically. The original deadline was July 1. OSHA also said that the delay would give employers more time to prepare their systems for electronic submissions and get…
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Creating a Strong Safety Program for Your Fleet Drivers

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While most operations with an automotive or trucking fleet focus on safety, few businesses are actually monitoring their drivers to make sure they are adhering to the company’s rules, a new study has found. Many companies only pull reports on their drivers’ records on an annual basis, which means they miss important developments like a DUI or a few moving violations that will increase the cost of insuring them. In fact, 70% of companies with fleets do not even monitor their drivers and 60% don’t have a safety program in place, according to the study by SambaSafety, a firm that…
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Silica Safety Enforcement Delayed for Construction Industry

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Cal/OSHA has delayed enforcement of its crystalline silica safety standard for the construction industry for another three months to ensure the California rules are in synch with federal rules on the dangerous airborne matter. The move came after Fed OSHA announced April 6 a delay in adoption of the crystalline silica standard for the sector “to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers.” The silica rules have already been in effect for general industry since 2016 and the delay in enforcement is only for the construction industry. Enforcement for the construction sector was slated to start…
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Drug Use Skyrockets among American Workers

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Drug use is rapidly increasing among American workers, as more states liberalize marijuana laws, cocaine makes a resurgence and more people abuse amphetamines and heroin. A new study by Quest Diagnostics Inc., a workplace drug-testing lab, found that the number of workers testing positive for illicit drugs is higher than at any time in the last 12 years. That puts employers in a tricky predicament, particularly if employees are using at work, which could reduce productivity and also make them more susceptible to workplace injuries since they may not be as focused as they should be on their work. In…
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Getting Buy-in from Managers on Workplace Safety Programs

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One of the keys to instituting a good safety program is to get management and supervisor buy-in. You need their support and belief in the system if you are to convince your employees to embrace your safety regimen. If your managers don’t believe in the safety plans you have put together, it will show through when they try to sell them to your staff. If you don’t have buy-in from your managers, the chances are slim to none that your employees will embrace the changes you are proposing. Managers play a crucial role in getting employees on board with safety….
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How Tracking Near Misses, Employee Training Reduces Injuries

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The latest trend in workplace safety best practices is tracking “leading indicators” – or events that take the lessons learned from past events – to reduce the chances of future injuries. Safety professionals are increasingly keeping track of near misses, hours spent on training and facility housekeeping and measuring the impact on the organization’s overall safety record. And they are finding that this approach is having a significant impact in preventing injuries. The trend is a new one. For years, workplace safety managers and industrial safety engineers used lagging indicators to track and manage workplace injuries and illness. They would…
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Report, Investigate Near Misses to Improve Safety

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One of the most important workplace safety tools that you can put to use is the reporting of near misses and correcting the factors that led to such a close encounter. A near miss is an event that could have led to a workplace injury, illness or death. While you are not required to report near misses to your insurer, you should be taking note of them as they can help you identify deficiencies in your workplace safety protocols. You should use near misses as the starting point to conduct inspections that could help you prevent a real workplace injury…
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New Slip, Trip, Fall Prevention Rules for General Industry – copy

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Federal OSHA implemented a new rule on Jan. 17 that is aimed at reducing slip, trip and fall hazards in the workplace. The revisions are aimed at tackling one of the main causes of worker deaths and injuries in American workplaces by applying rules designed for the construction and manufacturing sectors to other general industries. They add requirements for personal fall protection systems and eliminate existing mandates to use guardrails as a primary fall protection method. They also allow employers to choose from accepted fall protection systems which type they want to use. The new standard will prevent some 30…
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How Three Companies Reduced Their Workers’ Comp Costs

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We’ve told you often in these pages about various workplace safety and claims management techniques, but sometimes it’s good to learn from the first-hand experiences of other employers. The National Underwriter insurance trade publication recently profiled three companies that had reduced their workers’ comp costs using a combination of claims management and safety initiatives. You can use their experience to apply similar programs at your company.   SMS Holdings’ experience This housekeeping and maintenance service provider did not roll out a one-size-fits-all approach to safety at is multiple locations in 46 states. The company instead took a silo approach to…
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