#MeToo Movement to Spawn Wave of Sexual Harassment Lawsuits

| posted in Blog

After revelations of sexual misconduct by a number of high-power executives, media personalities and politicians last year spawned the #MeToo movement, defense lawyers are predicting a record number of sexual harassment lawsuits will be filed against employers in the coming year. The #MeToo movement has emboldened women who have been sexually harassed, abused or worse by a work superior or co-worker to come out and tell their stories. Any employer whose workers were subjected to this kind of behavior is at risk of being sued, regardless of whether or not the employer knew about the incident. The costs of sexual…
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Sexual Harassment Lawsuits: How to Protect Your Company

| posted in Uncategorized

By now, employers should all realize and understand that sexual harassment is illegal. However, what they might not be aware of are two 20-year-old rulings by the U.S. Supreme Court that: • Expanded what is termed sexual harassment; • Expanded the responsibility that employers have to provide a work environment that’s non-hostile; and • Did away with harassed employees having to prove that their company holds some responsibility or that their career suffered from lack of promotion, firing, demotion, or other such action. Employers are now directly responsible for employee behavior, thereby giving harassed workers more recourse in bringing about…
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A Guide to The DOL’s New Overtime Regulations

| posted in Blog

The Department of Labor has more than doubled the salary threshold for exempt employees to $47,476, which means anyone earning less than that must be eligible for overtime if they work more than 40 hours a week. The increase equates to a minimum salary of $913 per week, compared to the current $455 per week – or $23,660 a year. This means if you employ someone who is currently an exempt manager and they earn less than $47,476, they will be non-exempt starting Dec. 1, unless you give them a raise. If they work more than 40 hours a week,…
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California Wage & Hour Violations Can Create Personal Liability

| posted in Uncategorized

A new California law gives the state labor commissioner expansive new powers to go after employers that have judgments against them for non-payment of wages, including issuing stop-work orders and holding officers personally liable. The Fair Day’s Pay Act, which took effect Jan. 1, adds a whole new section to the state Labor Code aimed at reducing wage theft and making employers pay for skirting wage and hour laws. Specifically, those violations include: • Final payment of wages at termination. • Issuing wage statements. • Meal and rest break laws. • Overtime. • Expense reimbursement. • Payment of minimum wage….
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How the Abercrombie & Fitch Religious Discrimination Ruling Affects Employers

| posted in Blog

A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 1, 2015 has put employers on notice about religious attire and their employment and hiring practices. The high court held that an employer’s dress code prohibiting all headwear is not a defense against religious discrimination liability, even in cases where an employer suspects – but is not sure – that an applicant’s or employee’s garb is worn for religious purposes. In this case, a woman who had worn a hijab headscarf to an interview was eventually denied a position with the retailer despite the fact that the interviewer had recommended her…
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