Could Your Staff Respond to a Medical Emergency?

| posted in Blog

If one of your employees or a customer had a serious medical emergency while at work, would your staff know how to respond? Unfortunately, most U.S. employees are not prepared to handle cardiac emergencies in the workplace because they lack training in CPR and first aid, according to new survey results from the American Heart Association. The AHA found that most workers do not have access to CPR and first aid training, and half could not locate an automated external defibrillator at work. The findings reflect the poor preparation many people have for dealing with a medical emergency and, since…
Read More

OSHA Electronic Filing Deadline Extended to December

| posted in Blog

OSHA has issued final rules that delay for large employers and those in high-risk industries the electronic filing deadline for 2016 annual injury and illness records until Dec. 1, 2017. The new rule changes an Obama-era federal OSHA regulation that required employers with 250 workers, in addition to firms with 20 or more employees operating in various high-risk industries (such as construction, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation and retail) to file their 2016 Form 300A electronically. The original deadline was July 1. OSHA also said that the delay would give employers more time to prepare their systems for electronic submissions and get…
Read More

Indoor Workers Can Also Get Heat Illness; Here’s How to Protect Them

| posted in Blog

As temperatures soar this summer, it’s not only outdoor workers that toil under the sun who are at risk of heat illness. Workers in warehouses, boiler rooms and factories are also susceptible to heat illness, which can cause severe symptoms – and even death. The temperature inside these facilities can often exceed 80 degrees, the threshold at which employers with outdoor workers are required by Cal/OSHA to take certain steps to protect their workers from heat illness. And on extreme heat days, even the air conditioners can sometimes not keep up with cooling down the building, making workers uncomfortable and…
Read More

How Management Can Demonstrate Safety Buy-In

| posted in Blog

We’ve had many articles about workplace safety and that in order for you to have a successful workplace safety program you need not only employee buy-in, but also management buy-in. If the management can show its leadership and commitment to promoting and ensuring a safe workplace, getting staff to fall in line is easier. Dr. Isabel Perry, CEO of The Safety Doctor, a workplace safety app, recently posted a blog about the 18 examples of management involvement she has observed visiting job sites and conducting workplace safety interviews, benchmarking, safety conferences and more. These are the specific examples she identified…
Read More

Will OSHA Conduct an Inspection after an Employee Complaint?

| posted in Blog

OSHA will make inspections of a workplace for a variety of reasons, including following a worker injury and always after a worker’s death. Inspections may also occur randomly or part of a program aimed at a particular industry that OSHA has decided to target. The other way an inspection may occur – and the main focus of this article – is if an employee contacts the agency to complain about possible safety violations. These complaints may or may not result in an inspection of your workplace based on certain conditions, including the timing of the complaint. Under OSHA regulations, a…
Read More

Silica Safety Enforcement Delayed for Construction Industry

| posted in Blog

Cal/OSHA has delayed enforcement of its crystalline silica safety standard for the construction industry for another three months to ensure the California rules are in synch with federal rules on the dangerous airborne matter. The move came after Fed OSHA announced April 6 a delay in adoption of the crystalline silica standard for the sector “to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers.” The silica rules have already been in effect for general industry since 2016 and the delay in enforcement is only for the construction industry. Enforcement for the construction sector was slated to start…
Read More

OSHA Pulls the Plug on Electronic Reporting Rules

| posted in Blog

Federal OSHA has suspended its much anticipated and dreaded electronic filing rules for workplace injury and illness records. The rules, put in place during the Obama Administration, would have required organizations with 250 or more employees to submit electronically information from OSHA Forms 300 (Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses), 300A (Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses), and 301 (Injury and Illness Incident Report). The same rules would also apply to employers with between 20 and 249 employees in certain industries, including agriculture, construction, manufacturing, retail and transportation. A major thrust of the rules was to name and shame employers…
Read More

New OSHA Rules Delayed, Watered down under Trump

| posted in Blog

Acting on new marching orders from the Trump Administration, federal OSHA seems to be scaling back some regulations to benefit employers. Significantly, it seems that large employers will not be required to start submitting their injury and illness reports electronically as required by Obama-era regulations that were to take effect in February. The idea was that these electronic filings would become public information easily accessed online, as part of Obama’s push to publically shame companies with poor workplace safety records. Under current regulations, establishments with 250 or more employees in industries covered by the record-keeping regulation must submit information from…
Read More

When Safety Shortcuts Become a Criminal Act

| posted in Blog

As the economy grows and companies’ operations are busier, workplace injuries also increase. And as companies add employees, they may fail to keep up their safety regimens, which can result in an uptick in workplace injuries. Some businesses have so much to keep track of that they may be negligent in enforcing their safety standards and making sure that all of their safety devices are in proper operating order. When an employee is injured due to an employer’s negligence in keeping up its safety practices, there is typically no right of action for the employee under the exclusive remedy bargain…
Read More

Report, Investigate Near Misses to Improve Safety

| posted in Blog

One of the most important workplace safety tools that you can put to use is the reporting of near misses and correcting the factors that led to such a close encounter. A near miss is an event that could have led to a workplace injury, illness or death. While you are not required to report near misses to your insurer, you should be taking note of them as they can help you identify deficiencies in your workplace safety protocols. You should use near misses as the starting point to conduct inspections that could help you prevent a real workplace injury…
Read More