Pallet Safety Key to Preventing Many Injuries

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If you have a warehouse and store products on pallets, you may not be aware that they present one of the most common workplace hazards. The most common injuries around pallets are when workers trip over them or step or fall on them. Sometimes employees will step on a wooden pallet for support to reach something up high. Also, an empty pallet that has not been put away creates a tripping hazard, and injuries from this cause are the most common. Many workers hurt themselves because they did not see the pallet or were not aware that it could break…
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Fall Protection Training Makes Debut on OSHA’s Top 10 Citations List

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There’s a newcomer to OSHA’s top 10 list of violations that it cites every year: Fall Protection – Training Requirements. While physical fall protection violations, like failing to install guard-rails or provide fall protection equipment, continue to feature at the top of the list, this is the first time that training requirements as a stand-alone category has made it onto OSHA’s preliminary list of most-cited violations has featured. The fact that OSHA has doled out so many citations for such training-requirement violations reflects its increasing commitment to reduce injuries and deaths from trips, slips and falls – the most common…
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Protecting Your Workers in Wildfire Areas

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If you have workers in a wildfire zone, you need to have measures in place to protect them in the event of a catastrophe. Smoke from these wildfires is dangerous as it contains chemicals, gases and fine particles that can lodge deep in people’s lungs. This can make it difficult to breathe, aggravate asthma as well as existing heart and lung conditions – not to mention all the coughing and wheezing that most people would experience. To protect workers exposed to wildfire smoke, Cal/OSHA recommends that employers take the following measures: • Engineering controls like using a filtered ventilation system…
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Eight Tips for Improving Personal Protective Equipment and Safety Compliance

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Having adequate personal protective equipment on hand and available for employees to use is a critical part of your workplace safety and compliance program. OSHA regulations and applicable federal laws make employers responsible for the following: • A thorough and complete survey and assessment of workplace hazards. • Identifying all PPE required and ensuring it is purchased in sufficient quantity. • Training in proper PPE usage and wear. • Enforcing rules requiring PPE usage. • Inspecting and maintaining PPE and replacing it when it gets worn out or becomes unserviceable. • Keeping records of safety incidents and updating your PPE…
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Penalties Hiked for OSHA Violations in California

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New penalties for workplace safety infractions in California took effect on Sept. 14, nearly doubling the maximum fines that Cal/OSHA can levy on employers who are cited. California was required to increase its penalties in response to penalty hikes implemented by Fed-OSHA last year. The new penalties, which apply to all citations issued on or after Sept. 14, are as follows: • General and regulatory violations, including posting and recordkeeping violations: Maximum penalty has increased to $12,471, from $7,000. • Willful and repeat violations: Maximum penalty has risen to $124,709, from $70,000. • Willful and repeat violations: Minimum penalty has…
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Give Your Workplace First Aid Program a Checkup

| posted in Blog, Newsletter

Workplace injuries cost employers hundreds of billions of dollars every year. The direct costs of paying workers’ compensation payments to injured employees now tops $1 billion every week, according to information from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. While most companies focus on workplace safety and try to keep their employees safe from industrial accidents, they must also keep on hand proper first aid kits. And if you haven’t updated your kit in the past few years, you should know that OSHA in 2015 changed the minimum allowable standard for basic first aid kits. Here’s what you need to know:…
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Could Your Staff Respond to a Medical Emergency?

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If one of your employees or a customer had a serious medical emergency while at work, would your staff know how to respond? Unfortunately, most U.S. employees are not prepared to handle cardiac emergencies in the workplace because they lack training in CPR and first aid, according to new survey results from the American Heart Association. The AHA found that most workers do not have access to CPR and first aid training, and half could not locate an automated external defibrillator at work. The findings reflect the poor preparation many people have for dealing with a medical emergency and, since…
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OSHA Electronic Filing Deadline Extended to December

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OSHA has issued final rules that delay for large employers and those in high-risk industries the electronic filing deadline for 2016 annual injury and illness records until Dec. 1, 2017. The new rule changes an Obama-era federal OSHA regulation that required employers with 250 workers, in addition to firms with 20 or more employees operating in various high-risk industries (such as construction, agriculture, manufacturing, transportation and retail) to file their 2016 Form 300A electronically. The original deadline was July 1. OSHA also said that the delay would give employers more time to prepare their systems for electronic submissions and get…
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Indoor Workers Can Also Get Heat Illness; Here’s How to Protect Them

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As temperatures soar this summer, it’s not only outdoor workers that toil under the sun who are at risk of heat illness. Workers in warehouses, boiler rooms and factories are also susceptible to heat illness, which can cause severe symptoms – and even death. The temperature inside these facilities can often exceed 80 degrees, the threshold at which employers with outdoor workers are required by Cal/OSHA to take certain steps to protect their workers from heat illness. And on extreme heat days, even the air conditioners can sometimes not keep up with cooling down the building, making workers uncomfortable and…
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How Management Can Demonstrate Safety Buy-In

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We’ve had many articles about workplace safety and that in order for you to have a successful workplace safety program you need not only employee buy-in, but also management buy-in. If the management can show its leadership and commitment to promoting and ensuring a safe workplace, getting staff to fall in line is easier. Dr. Isabel Perry, CEO of The Safety Doctor, a workplace safety app, recently posted a blog about the 18 examples of management involvement she has observed visiting job sites and conducting workplace safety interviews, benchmarking, safety conferences and more. These are the specific examples she identified…
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