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Drug Testing in Workers’ Comp Skyrockets


Drug testing of injured workers by treating doctors has skyrocketed over the past seven years as painkiller abuse continues and physicians want to monitor their patients for staying with their prescribed drug regimen.
The use of urine drug testing on injured workers in California increased 2,431% between 2007 and 2014, according to the California Workers’ Compensation Institute (CWCI).
During that period, urine drug tests grew from 10% to 59% of all California workers’ compensation laboratory services, while drug testing reimbursements increased from 23% to 77% of all lab payments in the system.
The rapid increase reflects the growing concern among workers’ comp insurers and employers about workers getting hooked on high-strength pain medications known as opioids, and similar pain drugs.
Other studies by the institute have found that adding opioids into the picture can greatly increase the time an injured worker is away from work recovering, as well as the cost of the claim.
Also, doctors are increasingly using the tests to ensure injured workers are taking the medicines they prescribe. The downside is that the cost of the testing continues to increase and can easily be a few thousand dollars, adding significantly to the cost of claims.
And the trend is not unique to California. In a recent multi-state study by the Workers’ Compensation Research Institute on injured workers with long-term opioid use, the percentage of workers who received at least one drug test increased from 16% to 25%.
Not only are more injured workers being tested, but workers themselves are being tested more, as well.

Here are some other significant findings from the study:
• Between 2003 and 2012, the average number of drug testing service dates for injured workers who received these services increased by 9% at 12 months post-injury; 35% at 24 months post-injury; and 350% at 36 months post-injury.
• Among the injured workers who were drug tested, the average number of tests per employee more than tripled from 4.5 in 2007 to 14.9 in 2014, driving the average amount paid per date of service from $96 in 2007 to $307 in 2014 – a 220% increase.
• The number of providers who were paid for testing injured workers climbed from 428 in 2008 to 876 in 2014. Much of that growth is attributed to a migration towards physician in-office testing, because testing equipment has drastically come down in price.

• The amount paid for drug tests in California workers’ comp are based on Medicare billing rules. These rules were revised in 2010 and 2011, after Medicare determined there were questionable billing practices for drug tests taking place.
The CWCI study found that after those changes were made, the mix of tests used on injured workers changed. Drug screens, which are used to identify the presence or absence of a drug, accounted for a smaller share of tests.
Meanwhile, quantitative tests, which are used to measure the amount of a drug sample, increased sharply. The CWCI notes quantitative tests are not subject to the tighter Medicare billing rules, perhaps explaining the increase.

Is it necessary?
Drug testing is in part related to the increasing costs and prescriptions for drugs in the workers’ comp system, as well as the fact that testing has shifted from labs to doctors’ offices, which can now afford testing equipment that was too expensive in the past.
Several medical treatment guidelines do call for doctors prescribing opioids to also test for illicit drug use under certain circumstances, such as when addiction or abuse is detected or when patients are at risk for overdose and death, sources said.
Doctors need to identify patients abusing drugs because it is inappropriate to provide them opioids and it can change the treatment required for them.
Proponents of drug testing say it helps keep injured workers’ medicinal intake in check to ensure they are sticking with their drug regimens and also not abusing prescription pain medications.
Tests revealing that patients are using drugs for other than “clinical health” can also help workers’ comp payers arguing before a judge or hearing officer regarding their responsibility for the claimant.
The purpose of testing is to assist in medical management. Still, testing should be done based on medical necessity related to a claimant’s medical presentation, dispensed drugs and evidence-based medicine protocols.